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I strolled around Mopti today and first went to see Niger River - the lifeline of West Africa - where quite a few Malian women were doing some washing in the river despite the murky water.

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An interesting thing about this washing was that the women just put their washed clothes right on the ground to dry them because there was nowhere to hang them otherwise.

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I also went to see a small market in town where fish, veggies, fruits, and very basic commodities were selling. Lots of women dressed in all kinds of colours and it looked to me that they spiced up Mopti's monotonous and dry atmosphere.

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There is a mud-made mosque in Mopti. This mosque is quite small compared to the one in Djenne, about 3-hour south west of Mopti, but I was still enthralled to see a building entirely made of mud like this one for the very first time in my life (I'm going to Djenne next week.)

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The design of this mosque was very unique and something that I'd never seen before anywhere else on my RTW trip. Unfortunately, I wasn't allowed to go inside, though.

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One more thing to be mentioned in this article:
I saw some things while strolling around Mopti and I wished that I hadn't seen them. Extreme poverty in combination with filthiness was clearly evident in this part of Africa. I have seen similar situations in a few countries in Latin America and South East Asia before, but not to this extent.

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Local kids in Mali are very curious about a foreigner like me and I found them very energetic and innocent just like other kids in the rest of the world. However, these kids have absolutely nothing. Nothing at all.
Mali (also Senegal) urgently needs international support more than ever.

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